Tag Archives: mage

Listmania part 2: Favorite individual issues

Daredevil #181 “Last Hand” April 1982: Frank Miller was just hitting his stride and the character of Elektra was becoming hugely popular.  I remember picking this one up at the local newsstand and thinking it was just going to be cover hype.  I was already a jaded fan at that point.  By the time I was done reading this I had a new interest in comics.

Justice League of America #0 “Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow” September 2006: This was more like favorite single page.  Each of the short scenes in this story are interesting, but the single page that references Batman’s reaction after Superman was killed by Doomsday redefined the character for me and put a lump in my throat.  You don’t often think of Batman as human and this changed that for me.

The stunning wraparound cover to Mage #14

Mage #14 “…Or Not to be” August 1986:  This was the issue after the series lost the character that was the emotional center of the book and set out the direction for the lead Kevin Matchstick.  Drawing the parallels to King Arthur seemed odd on the first page, but by the last page I could not imagine a time when I couldn’t see them.

Beautiful Stories for Ugly Children #21 “Dances with Cows” February 1991:  There was never a point I didn’t love this forgotten series from Piranha Press (a DC precursor to Vertigo), but this issue was funny and sad and odd all at once.  I really wish they would collect this anthology series in bookshelf volumes.  There is a large amount of creator owned and fringe material that is all but lost to readers now unless they search out the original back-issues.  This series was uneven at times, but so different from what was out there then, and still very readable now, that it could not help but find a new audience today.

Miracleman #22 “Carnival” August 1991:  It is very hard to pick a single issue from this amazing series, and picking a Gaiman issue over a Moore one might be considered a bad choice, but this issue had an emotional core that would resonate with anyone, even people who had not read the preceding 21 issues.  It touched on much of what had come before without ever relying on it and made this a stand-alone issue that really packed an emotional punch.  Now all we need is for these to be reprinted.

Avengers Annual #10 “By Friends — Betrayed!” 1981:  An uninspired Al Milgrom cover (nothing against Al, the cover just didn’t work for the book) covered up the first appearance of Rouge, and began a run of X-Men stories that would see the book rise in sales to be Marvel’s biggest book for many years to come.  The fact that it was in an Avengers book, and that the X-Men are only in a few pages of it messed with my head a bit, but this really is more of an X-book than an Avengers one.  Art by the amazing Michael Golden with inks by Armando Gil gave this book a look that no other book at the time had.  This is collected (finally) in Marvel Masterworks X-Men vol 7 and the Claremont omnibus.  It had been reprinted before, but never in an edition where it really worked, and certainly not as nicely as it is here.

Lord Julius and a “like-a-look”. Cerebus #137

Cerebus #137 (& 138–sort of) “Epilogue” August 1990:  This was a single story that Sim used an issue and a half for, but the first part is the best.  It has never been collected in the phone books since it was a fun filler issue that really does not fit in either the book before it (Jaka’s Story) or the one that followed it (Melmoth), but gives a silly look at Lord Julius and his “like-a-looks”, explaining a lot about the character in a funny way.  It is available ONLY as the original issue(s) or in Cerebus #0 which collected the other in-between issues that are not included in any of the phone books.

Toad Men!?!?

Sensational She-Hulk #2 “Attack of the Terrible Toad Men” June 1989:  The first issue seemed like a fluke or a one-off, but when they did this one I was left in awe of how funny this book really was.  Byrne left the book after issue 8 over a flap with editorial and the book never quite recovered, until his return in issue #31 that is!  Then he left at issue 50 and the decline started all over.  Dan Slott did some fun stuff with Shulkie later, but this series is still the best there has been.

Alpha Flight #12 “… And One Shall Surely Die” July 1984:  I freely admit I was one of the zombies that jumped on this Byrne book when it arrived, and I loved it for the first years’ worth of stories.  Byrne himself has said he never really saw the point of having an AF book, but it didn’t show for most of his time on the book.  This issue was a surprise in every way.  Yes, they advertised that a major character was going to die for weeks in advance, but how often had we heard that before only to see some turd third stringer die?  Yes, death in comics has since become a revolving door plot hammer.  Never in a million years did I think Byrne would GUT the heart out of the team and kill someone as important as that!  Naive of me?  Maybe, but I had not become so jaded at that point and just didn’t see it coming.  This book gave me chills, and still does when I read it.

Uncanny X-Men #186 “Lifedeath” October 1984:  The single most beautifully drawn mainstream issue of the 1980s.  Barry Windsor Smith as inked by Terry Austin was too much for many at the time. It was a challenging story that made me expect more (too much) from my comics after that.

Superman #712 (had to sneak this one in) “Lost Boy: A Tale of Krypto the Superdog” August 2011:  I was never a huge fan of big blue and have only occasionally read his adventures.  What I AM is a dog person.  This was an inventory story used to fill time while the Grounded arc needed to get caught up.  This issue was better than ANY of those.  I defy any dog person out there to not be an emotional wreck after reading this book.

This was a REALLY hard list. To just come up with ten (OK, eleven) was really tough, and if asked in a month I would think that there would be changes.

Feel free to start throwing chair and arguing, but I would really rather see some other people’s lists.

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A little listmania! part 1: favorite stories

Blogger wwayne got me thinking about my favorites;  Favorite story arcs and favorite single issues.  Putting the definitions as simply as possible ( since us geeks love to argue about the definitions ) we get….

Story arc:  a  story occurring within an ongoing series.  OK, that is not going to work for me, dammit!  Since I am a trade waiter and have been for 2 decades, some of this will have to be at least a little in the self-contained series vein.  But I will try to justify and explain as I go.

Single issue:  Just like it says on the tin, a single issue of an ongoing series.

So, in no particular order except the order if find them on the shelf….

Concrete:  Strange Armor.  (1997)  This is where the definition gave me trouble as Concrete creator Paul Chadwick didn’t really DO an ongoing Concrete series, just connected limited series, the definition became an issue.  Also in the age of trades and collections the actual issues of a particular arc are harder to recall.  This one I did read as the single issues when they came out in late 97 and early 98.  A 5-issue limited in the continuing story of Ron Lithgow, this was the story that finally gave the full and definitive origin of the character, and fleshed out the back story greatly.  The “series” of concrete stories that Chadwick has done are an amazing character study with its roots in the sci-fi and super hero stories he grew up with and have more heart than any other book(s) I have read since.  All but the most recent DHP series have been collected as trades and are still powerful today.

Cerebus #139 to 150 (Melmoth). (1990) The was the story that followed Jaka’s Story and is one of the shorter Cerebus arcs.  A beautifully written and drawn book, it explores the final days of Oscar Wilde as seen in this fictionalized universe.  Taken directly from contemporary accounts of friends of the dying writer, this is a powerful and sad story.  It is available in “phone book” number 6 of the Cerebus run.

Action Comics  #866 to 870. (2008) Geoff Johns and Gary Frank update and redefine the Brainiac character.  One of the most successful updates DC has ever done.  Gary frank’s art is at its very best here.  Available as the Superman Brainiac trade.

Justice League of America#1 to 7  (2006)  Brad Meltzer is a polarizing figure in comics thanks in large part to the love it or hate it Identity Crisis series.  (loved it)  This arc started up the new volume of JL with artist Ed Benes, and is a story that actually made me interested in JL.  What got me into the story in the first place was my affection for Red Tornado, and this story focuses on him and his existence heavily and is a great team book to boot.  Available as The Tornado’s Path trade collection.

Planetary #7 to 12 (2000)  After setting up the world of Elijah Snow and his team in the first arc, Warren Ellis and John Cassaday outdid themselves on this arc (available as Planetary:  The Fourth Man collection).  The jumped into the homages of the comics with both feet here.  They did versions of Transmepolitan, Hellblazer, Doc Savage and touched on the origins of the big three at DC and still managed to keep the main story moving forward without the meanderings that affected some of the later issues.

My Jill Thompson sketch in my Absolute edition

Sandman #41 to 49 (1992)  This was the arc that really made the series sing for me.  After the A Game of You arc cooled me on the series (It took me years to learn to appreciate it) this series just sang with life.  Gaiman was really flying here and this is the run that made me love Jill Thompson’s art.  This is available in the Brief Lives collection or in Absolute Sandman vol 3.

Fantastic Four #242 to 244 (1982)  I still go back and read these every few months.  In fact the whole #240 to 250 part of John Byrne’s run is just crazy fun to read!  This was the first Galactus story I read that I actually liked.  Available in several reprint volumes from FF Visionaries vol 2 to the big-ass omnibus collection of the Byrne run.

Uncanny X-Men #165 to 168 (1982)  Paul Smith’s first issues on this title were the wrap up to Chris Claremont’s Brood story.  ( I include 168 here as the epilogue to that story–because I CAN!) To this day, his art in these issues is amazing to look at.  Collected in too many versions to count.

Mage #1 to 15 (1984)  Technically this was a limited series, but to my mind, when you know that you are just going to do a series of limited series, it is just a series with breaks.  In the case of Mage the break between the first and second series was a little more than just a break.  The same is true with the ongoing wait for the third series.  This story by Matt Wagner was lightning in a bottle.

Avengers #198 to 200 (1980)  This was David Michelinie and George Perez’s last regular issues on the title(in a run anyway) and they rent out with a great story that was a follow-up to the Claremont/Golden story in Avengers Annual #10.  This run is not yet collected.  Hopefully the Marvel Masterworks will continue long enough to get to these.

Well, I stuck to 10.  I omitted runs where there was a single good issue that MADE that run, and I avoided genuine limited series.  Maybe that will be another list.  Next up…

Favorite single issues…

 

 

 

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Why not these comics as movies & TV…?

With all the effort and money being spent on movies and TV shows based on comic book properties, I was thinking about some of the untapped potential out there to convert comic properties into either movies or TV series.

The first one that seems to get the most regular fan service is Sandman.  Personally, I think this would make an awful movie, or at least need to be so changed to translate, that it would offend every fan of the book out there.  Make no mistake, I am a fan of this book, but this is just not going to make a good film.  It would make a great TV series though.  I know they are working on American Gods and I hope that it translates well giving Gaiman and the producers the desire to try it with Sandman

Another book I would really like to see done for TV is Mage by Matt Wagner.  The style of this story would lend itself well to the format and be a very fun series.  Despite the need for some serious special effects in the story, they are manageable; the cast would be a relatively small one.  To be honest though, I would just be happy if the final book of the 3 book series would show up before I die.  Wagner’s other property; Grendel would also make for a pretty decent ongoing TV series.

Something that might make a fun all ages film is Joe the Barbarian, by Grant Morrison and Sean Murphy.  It could be done as light or as dark depending on what the film makers want.  The story is something that could be very malleable without wholesale changes and is a touching and involving story that can reach any audience.  Another good potential source for another all ages film is I Kill GiantsThis is still one of my favorite books and I cannot imagine this one failing if it were done by someone good.  Hey, Pixar, jump at it!

Why Strangers in Paradise has not been done as a TV show is beyond me.  Terry Moore’s masterpiece has it all.  Drama, complex relationships, sex, violence and plenty of room for melodrama of the prime time soap variety.  It crosses most of the adult target demographics and still manages a very powerful and intense story.  This would most certainly need to be on a network like HBO, as the content would need to be fairly adult, but this show just screams “must watch”.

Paul Chadwick’s Concrete might translate well to either medium, really.  It is such a well told story that just about any way you decided to tell it, could work.  There is the sci-fi/fantasy element and the dramatic aspects that could really set a show based on this one of the coolest offerings in either medium.

Am I the only one out there that would love to see another Rocketeer movie?  Slap Zac Effron or Taylor Lautner in the helmet and that is a movie that makes a pile of cash. (The wife unit agrees strongly on this one)

Since Hollywood is doing so much rebooting, it would be nice to see some of the books that were ruined back in the day, be given a proper treatment.  Dr Strange could be super cool now and Marvel is said to be working on it.  The 1978 made-for-TV movie starring Peter Hooten was so cheaply done that it is actually a little trippy and cool, but with all the play sparkly vampires and young monster hunters get these days, just make him a 20 something (or a very youthful and cool 30) and this film sells itself.

I would like to see another try at Isis too.  The Saturday morning Shazam/Isis Power Hour was fun for the mid 70’s and could probably be well done today.  But that is just me wishing. 

A failed attempt to bring Wonder Woman back last year shows that the mainstream is not ready for this one yet.  Either David E Kelly tanked it or a Linda Carter-less show is just not going to fly .  Speaking of failed tries, Global Frequency had lots of potential but Warner Brothers soured on it when they failed to grasp the viral quality of fans on the internet. At least the pilot is out the to be downloaded.

These and all the great series that have made good cartoons series like FF, Justice League etc; there are piles of worthy material waiting to be tapped.

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Free Comic Book Day 2011 and Jill Thompson!

Free Comic Book Day 2011 has come and gone. This was my first actually, despite being the tenth one for the rest of the world.
I never really had an interest untill this year as my LCS was having Jill Thompson for a guest signing to coincide with the event.  But more on that later.

I hope that this event works, in that it brings in new lasting fans of the medium or brings in returning fans, but I don’t think I have ever really seen evidence of that.  Most of the shop owners that I speak to say they rarely see any real lasting bump from the event.  I would imagine that if 5% of the people who come and are new or returning readers actually make more trips after the day to buy more stuff, that would be a good result.  Based on what I have seen and heard from others over the years of speaking to shop owners, the majority of people who come in on FCBD are existing fans looking…

a. To score free books.  My LCS has the 2 book per person rule.  If you wore a comic book flavored shirt, you got five.

b. To get a sample of something they have not read.  Many of the companies that participate, use the occasion to announce new and upcoming titles, while Marvel and DC use the chance to hype an event coming up in many of their established books.  If I had to pick, this would be where I think the main benefit from FCBD is felt.  Expanding the average reader’s pull list and spread the money out.  I have doubts on the helpfulness of this.  Most people only spend so much on books each month, so if they find something new they want to read, the eventual likelihood is that they will drop an existing book from the list.  Not really a bad thing, as it is a great example of fair competition in the free market.  But the industry has made a lifestyle choice for decades now that amounts to the cannibalization of its readership.  They seem content to recycle the same few readers over and over.  New readers enter the industry and then leave at almost the same rate it seems and the overall number of readers never really varies much.

This year there were 37 different titles available to choose from.  My choices, as I was wearing my old Mage shirt (as in Mage by Matt Wagner, also known for Grendel and some amazing work at DC over the years, not least is Trinity) were a pretty mixed bag.  I grabbed Worlds of Aspen from Aspen Comics publishers of the Michael Turner series Fathom.  BOOM Studio’s newest licensed book, Elric, based on the Michael Moorcock character.  This is the one I was most hoping to grab as I have been a fan of the books and the author for years.  Then there was the FCBD edition of The Tick from NEC.  Really, how do you NOT grab The Tick?  This one is a primer for the current series as a jumping on point for new or returning readers.  I was one of the very few that had read the original run long before there was a cartoon and failed TV show.  Used to love it.  We will see if the new book grabs me.  Then I got the FCBD edition of Locke & Key from IDW, a series I have been wanting to try for a while now.  Last was the DC book.  Unfortunately it is just a rehash of Green Lantern:  Secret Origin.  They really missed an opportunity there.  Either they could have hyped the upcoming film (if they wanted to stay with GL) or the new Flashpoint event.

Most of what I saw was not the kind of thing that suited me.  But at the same time, I don’t think there was much that would have been of great interest to a casual or new fan either.

The bright spot for me was Jill Thompson.  I have been a fan for many years, so having here sign books was really a nice treat.  I took my Absolute Sandman vol 3 for her to sign and a copy of the new Lil’ endless book, Delirium’s Party. 

I got the Lil Endless signed and when she grabbed the large Absolute volume she lit up very slightly and said something about making magic and proceeded to do a fantastic sketch inside…

It was done using a white out pen on the black inside paper just before the title page of the book.  It took maybe 3 minutes to do and looks great!

As an extra bonus, I dug out my first Thompson sketch from nearly 20 years ago…

This was from a signing that she did with Neil Gaiman when the Brief Lives arc of Sandman was coming out.  She was not announced as a guest in advance that I had been aware of and was doing sketches on the back of the flyer for the signing.  This year when we spoke briefly while she was creating the sketch in my book, I mentioned that.  It was an event she recalled quite clearly, stating that she had been really sick that day and was on the road with Neil to several shops in a couple of days and had not been able to do much to feel better.  Not that she showed it then though.  She is a pro.  I also was reintroduced to a number of her earlier works at the signing yesterday that I had all but forgotten.  The work she did for Comico on the early Bill Willingham title The Elementals, was something that I had read when it was released and not recalled her part in it. She also told a great story from her early days as a teenager in the industry.

Winding things up was a hardcover book written by Evan Dorkin, of Milk & Cheese fame.  The book is called Beasts of Burden and was released last year.  That is just one of the many things I have grown to enjoy about cons and signings.  No matter how familiar I am with a particular creator’s work, I always manage to find something that I did not know about.

So I will leave you with the cover to the book and look forward to the next thing I feel like blathering on about for 1000 words or so…

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Not really a review of The Fish Police

I really was going to do a review of The Fish Police TPB just released by IDW.  Really.  And I Will Talk briefly about it, but as I was going through the new volume, it dawned on me what an amazing year 1986 was for comics.  By 1986 I really mean an area of about 18 months between late 85 and early 87, but deal with it.

The greatest of the 1980s was beginning to fade at Marvel.  While still very good comics, X-Men having just hit #200 (and only really having the 1 main team book and a few so-so spin offs) had started to go off the rails for a little while.  Soon to recover for the home stretch of Claremont’s last few years, the book was getting a little bogged down in its own continuity.  Mostly from the editorial mandates of the new cool idea that was the crossover event.

Uncanny X-Men #213-Alan Davis and Paul Neary art

Uncanny X-Men #198-Barry Windsor-Smith art

Uncanny X-Men #210-John Romita Jr. and Dan Green art

 

The 3 covers here are huge issues in the myth.  They set up all the great ideas that Claremont had before they were ruined by other writers.  Storm’s character development just kept getting more and more interesting.  The beginnings of the Mutant Massacre storyline.  The start of the meat behind the Wolverine/Sabertooth rivalry, not to mention the first sustained appearance of eventual fan-favorite Psylocke.

Then there is John Byrne’s Fantastic Four.  Not quite what it had been, and coming to and end, but well worth the outrageous cover price of 75 cents!

And the run of Walt Simonson on Thor.

 

Thor #337- Walt Simonson art

 

This is arguably the best cover of 1986 and maybe the entire decade.

At DC The New Teen Titans were on a roll and the Crisis was about to reshape the DCU for the next decade.

But The Fish Police was one of the new crop of “independent” books.  Mostly creator owned and published by smaller upstart companies.  The black & while explosion was done and the implosion was about to begin.  Cerebus, by Dave Sim was about to hit issue #100, and Scott McLeod was about to DESTROY!!! New York City in one of the silliest, most enjoyable master classes on how to do a comic ever!

DESTROY!! 1986- Scott McLeod art

 

The Hairballs TPB. Reprinting the first 4 issues

Cerebus #83 Sept 1986-Dave Sim & Gerhard art

 

 

Among the very best was Mage, by Matt Wagner.  Published by Comico and running 15 amazing issue (with a second series to follow over a decade later and another one on the way before I die, I hope), Mage introduced us to Kevin Matchstick, Mirth and Edsel.  An allegorical tale of heroism in the modern world of the 1980s.  It also introduced us to the early work of the fabulous Sam Kieth inking the last 2/3s of the series.

Also available to readers of the great anthology series Epic Illustrated was The Sacred and the Profane by Dean Motter and Ken Stacy.  Collected in early 87, this was a powerful story set in a future where the Catholic Church sets off to colonize space in the name of God.  Also by Motter in 86 was Mister X, another favorite on a lot of top 10 lists.

And then there is a little indie book that no one ever heard of called Watchmen.

Mage #5 wraparound cover-art by Matt Wagner

I know this cover is from 85, but it is just too gorgeous not to put here.

Then there is Miracleman.  Originally called Marvelman, then Miracleman and now Marvelman again.  Probably the one book more messed about by lawyers than any other of the modern era.  Originally a knock-off of Captain Marvel (SHAZAM to you young uns), then revived by Alan Moore as a post modern and kinda moody hero, later done as a re shaper of the world by Neil Gaiman.  This is a book that is in limbo of the legal kind and has been since Eclipse comics went away.  Currently owned by Marvel, they have yet to do anything worthwhile with the character  (like reprinting the Moore and Gaiman run) and I begin to doubt we will ever see this book come back.  Some of the most beautiful art in this series was by John Totleben, who worked with Moore on Swamp Thing also out in 86!

 

Miracleman #15 art by John Totleben

 

J.M. DeMatties and Jon J Muth gave us Moonshadow.  This one was something of a Damascus moment for me as I had never seen anything quite like it before.  The story was as much fun fairytale as dark nightmare.  The counterpoint created by the watercolor art made this at the same time very unsettling and remarkably endearing.

 

Moonshadow #12 Jon J Muth art

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And then it all came to a head with Dark Knight Returns.  To reinvent Batman would be tried several times before and since, but nobody has ever managed to capture the pop culture zeitgeist like Frank Miller did with this 4 issue series.

There are just piles of other books, all equally deserving of attention…GrimjackAmerican Flagg! , Nexus and Badger from First comics.  The original run of Love and Rockets and Alan Moore’s Halo Jones.

Just too much fun!

 

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